Zimbabwe: Beautifully Written, Insightful, and Perceptive

I am pleased that Zimbabwe is the last country on the list, because I have a soft spot for the country and its people. I love traveling there, and I even sponsor a couple of AIDS orphan girls in Harare. I have read about every book set in Zimbabwe I’ve been able to get my … Continue reading Zimbabwe: Beautifully Written, Insightful, and Perceptive

Zambia: The Challenge between Old and New

Zambia, as so many other countries have gone through, and is still going through big changes in the society, and the way people think. There is always the pressure of tradition and modern life. Do you choose the old ways or your own ways? Bitterness by Malama Katulwende is therefore an apt description of what … Continue reading Zambia: The Challenge between Old and New

eSwatini: Girls’ Boarding School Years

The last absolute Monarchy of Africa is an interesting country. It has changed name from Swaziland to eSwatini after I started my reading journey around the globe. It is not an easy country to find a book from, but lucky there seems to be one author whose books can be found in English. It took … Continue reading eSwatini: Girls’ Boarding School Years

Uganda: To Get a Life with a Wife

Uganda is on my list of countries I am planning on travelling to soon, and I have read up quite a bit on this small African country. I know quite a bit about the fauna and national parks, as well as history, but i haven’t read a book written by a local until now. It … Continue reading Uganda: To Get a Life with a Wife

Tunisia: Universal Truths that Got the Book Banned in Its Home Country

For some reason I expected to find many books from Tunisia, but I was taken by surprise when I realized this was not the case. I was very lucky to find Lion Mountain by Mustapha Tlili on Internet Archives, which is a source I am thankful for, and I appreciate all the effort that has … Continue reading Tunisia: Universal Truths that Got the Book Banned in Its Home Country

Togo: From under the African Sun to above the European Snow

I was afraid I would once again have problems finding a book, because somehow I felt like Togo would not be a country with many authors. However, I found two books I immediately felt drawn to. Because I did not have access to my physical library at the time, it was an easy choice between … Continue reading Togo: From under the African Sun to above the European Snow

Tanzania: Forbidden Love

Tanzania is a big country with a rich and interesting history, 42 tribes, was made up of Tanganyika and Zanzibar, and it has a British past. I was sure there would be no problems finding a book written by a native African Tanzanian set in Tanzania. Turns out I was wrong. Tanzania has a strong … Continue reading Tanzania: Forbidden Love

Sudan: From Riches to Rags – Almost

Another big African country with a turbulent recent history, dictatorship, wars, and many internal conflicts. Until fairly recently Sudanese literature has been oral stories and narrative poems passed on from generation to generation. This African tradition fascinates me, since there must be millions of stories, but sadly most seem to be lost to us not … Continue reading Sudan: From Riches to Rags – Almost

South Sudan: From Lost Boys to Found Boys

South Sudan is a fairly new independent country, and it made me think I will never be able to find a book to read for this challenge. I was surprised to find one very quickly, in fact my library has one. I try to look for fiction, but sometimes I have to settle for nonfiction. … Continue reading South Sudan: From Lost Boys to Found Boys

South Africa: “Welcome to the World of Our Humanity…”

I am absolutely fascinated by Southern Africa in general, and I have this weird love/hate relationship with South Africa. It is a stunning country with friendly people and fabulous wildlife, but a terrible history. Still nowadays, 25 years after the end of Apartheid, you can still feel and see that even though it is officially … Continue reading South Africa: “Welcome to the World of Our Humanity…”